Posts Tagged ‘models’

Sketchbook: Waiting room

March 22, 2010

It was my birthday, bitter cold and snowy in Illinois.  My daughter was in surgery at St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria, and her husband and I had some nervous hours of waiting to do.  Sketch models were abundant, so I passed the time scribbling away while he worked on his laptop.  Overheard while I was working on these pages: “…and there was so much blood on the floor, I thought, man, this boy is dead….almost cut his whole arm off…locked  her in the basement with the dog.”  Well, I’d love to know more about that story….

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more life drawing

October 18, 2009

I’ve been enjoying sketching this lovely model who’s been posing for a couple of drawing groups.  She is so elegant and graceful, and I’ve never known a model who could hold a pose so well.  I don’t know how to spell her name…Ilema? but I’ll have to find out.

Not much other news; it’s been a very busy week with lots of work to do for WAAM; mostly I’ve been working on creating a blog for the organization. WordPress makes it pretty easy, but there are still plenty of tricky bits to work out.  Here ’tis: http://www.waamblog.wordpress.com .  Any suggestions are welcome.  The openings last night were great fun–lots of people showed up and the shows were much admired.  After, I wandered across the street to see Polly Law’s show at Oriole 9.  Her work, as always, looked spectacular.  I let Lenny Kislin convince me to show there next month…but I’m a bit nervous about it.  Some of the work will go directly from the Doghouse Gallery into the restaurant, because I don’t have time to make a lot of new pieces, but I hope the clientele is different so it doesn’t look like a rerun.  Whatever, it will be fun.  From Oriole 9 some friends and I went back to Saugerties to try out the new Fez restaurant, and were delighted with the food and ambience and prices.  The waitress (part owner maybe?) really had her hands full as the busboy didn’t show up, so it was just her and the chef–and the place was super-busy.  An odd closure to the evening: peeking into Dave’s Coffee House next door, we beheld something not often seen on Partition Street–a live lion cub!  Well, my companions saw it, but by the time I looked it was back in a covered cage…so they might  have been hallucinating….

One more note: I’ve put the entire Doghouse show (my work, not Mary Anne’s) here: http://loel.smugmug.com/Art/doghouse

life drawing

May 9, 2009

red nude

This is a 10-minute sketch I did at the life drawing session at WAAM on Thursday, when we had an amazing and beautiful model, a graceful young woman who could hold a pose without the slightest movement for a full 25 minutes.  The sessions are on alternate weeks, and I try not to miss a single one.  Life drawing is forgotten by many artists as soon as they leave art school, but I think it may be the single most important practice for an artist at any stage of his or her career.  It’s not about producing beautiful final works, it’s about seeing and training the hand to cooperate with the eye.  It’s about patience, and about speed…to catch something of the model during a one-minute pose is a challenge.  My greatest satisfaction comes when I feel that I have connected with the model, that I’ve captured something of her being…that doesn’t happen very often.  The practice itself is infinitely interesting to me…at first I try to match the media to the subject; some models need a light delicate pencil stroke, some demand great bold swaths of charcoal.  Good models bring themselves to the process; they care about what they’re doing, they’re into it, and it feels like there’s an energy transmitted between model and artist…when it’s going well my hand isn’t moving a pencil across paper, it’s in contact with the subject, following directly the line of a shoulder, the curve of fingers.  Hard to explain, but drawing from life is where I feel closest to pure Being, closest to meditation.

And it’s just fun, too, as are my pre-drawing lunches with Marcie and Annette…

PS–there’s a fabulous book about drawing, and many other aspects of art that I highly recommend: Undressed Art: Why We Draw